Spring Clean

March 28, 2019.  Spring has announced herself with an abundance of green coming up through dried leftovers of prior green frozen to the ground.  Lots to clean up in the yard!  I tackled the crinum bed alongside driveway a bit at a time to avoid arthritic reaction to the necessary bending, stooping at unusual angles.  This poem emerged from the meditative nature of putting face repeatedly near earth … plus it was Mother’s birthday.  The following day, my email brought me the poem Earth Song – including:

Those who are dead are never gone;
The dead are not down in the earth:
They are in the trembling of the trees

Indeed, Mother was right there with me in the crinums’ upward thrust.

PostSignature2

Crinums produce large lily-like blooms – mine are a vivid pink, prolific come June.

I’m unable to find a direct link to Earth Song, Traditional from Senegal.  I received it via Panhala – to subscribe, send a blank email to:

Panhala-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Post_2019-03-28_Image_CrinumSpringClean

Post_2019-03-28_Poem_SpringClean

Ablaze

January 8, 2019.  One of those stop-in-your-tracks encounters showed up in the sky late yesterday.  In a rush to get away from the day’s frenzies … forgot all about those energies  … standing transfixed in the driveway.  Colors and textures overhead gave the appearance of winter-bare tree limbs ablaze.  Just our imaginations, our luck to walk out when we did.

PostSignature2

post_2019-01-08_image_blazingsunset

post_2019-10-08_poem_ablaze

 

Beneath The Fan

September 27, 2018.  This poem emerged from a diverse spirituality group that meets every other month.  We each share something responding to the session’s focus – then we sit in silence.  Silence can be relative.  Certainly sounds normally unnoticed take on new significance when human clatter subsides.

Last week I took in red yucca seeds and a quote from Florida Scott-Maxwell in response to the challenge: What can you see when you are able to look past all your comfortable assumptions, judgments, prejudices, and fears?  There were several seed-related  responses, and the various seeds/interpretations were swirling in my head as we began what would’ve been silence … but for the old fan directly above me.

PostSignature

Post_2018-09-27_Image_CeilingFan

Post_2018-09-27_Poem_BeneathTheFan

Winter Spotlight

February 16, 2018.   My affinity for digital collage is two-fold — for the freedom to make a moon as dominant in the image as in my mind’s eye, and for the meditative process of detailing, removing distractions to emphasize desired geometry — directed by whim.

A nod to recent posts from Michael Fiveson (m5son.wordpress.com) and Stephanie Harper (slharperpoetry.com) – your words stirred mine.

PostSignature

Post_2018-02-16_Image_WinterMoon

Post_2018-02-16_Poem_WinterSpotlight

Pathway Choice

October 11, 2017.  On this clear October day, I went out to wander the backyard taking photos of fall-bloomers cultivated to attract butterflies.  One butterfly posed for me, and lots of bees.  But my eyes were primarily focused downward, trying not to trip over plants way beyond their beds.   The pathway (what I could see of it) began to fascinate more than the bright blooms.

PostSignature

Post_2017-10-11_Image_PathOverlap

Post_2017-10-11_Poem_PathwayChoice

Mosaic Moment

October 2, 2017.  A few days ago, on a ranch out in the Texas hill country, a group of us  spread ourselves out for individual silent contemplative wanders.  Our intended focus: “Earth connection”.   I headed for the labyrinth, which consistently helps me focus … and is made of Nature’s materials.

Even on the labyrinth, focus is vulnerable to the unexpected.  But then, paying attention to Nature’s surrounding energies is, in fact, connecting with Earth.

PostSignature

Post_2017-10-02_Image_MosaicCollage

Post_2017-10-02_Poem_MosaicMoment

Near Rociada

July 23, 2017.  Traveling still, now in cooler temperatures and higher elevations.  This afternoon’s rain kept us campsite-bound – an agreeable pace!  I’ve encountered several times lately promotions for “forest bathing” – Japanese Shinrinyoku – preventive healthcare practice of getting oneself out among trees.  Research proves its value.  My experience here bears witness.

PostSignature

Post_2017-07-23_Image_ForestBath

Post_2017-07-23_Poem_NearRociada

 

Defiance At Campground

July 19, 2017.  Traveling, taking in (our first time!) the 20th annual Woody Fest in Okemah, Oklahoma; WONDERFUL music experience for anyone considering what to do in future Julys!

Research led us to Pine Trees RV about 2 miles out of town – w,here we were under pines, overlooking a beautiful pond, at the end of a gravel road.  Blissful!  Those trees were most welcome in Oklahoma July heat.

We discovered a female kildeer thought so too – her “nest” barely out of traffic’s path. Speaking gently, approaching slowly, it was easy to get close.  But the moment I crossed her perceived boundary, she tripled in size and fierceness.  And I apologized!  (Right after snapping this image …)

PostSignature

Post_2017-07-19_Image_Defiance

Post_2017-07-19_Poem_Defiance

Tree Wise

May 21, 2017.  In the Texas hill country,  massive live oaks spread their huge limbs at unusual angles.  Over time the weight of continued growth lowers them toward the ground.  Like gigantic vines, they swoop in strong winds. Hundreds of years old, survivors of many a storm.  But not invincible.  At Red Corral, a deck constructed less than 20 years ago rises alongside one of these live oaks.  Initially, there was no contact between tree and fence along deck’s edge.  But the tree kept growing, lowering.  Now fence cuts into bark, a gash that gives pause.  While wind blustered, I stood for a while listening to the tree moan, the fence creak – each stuck in their odd relationship.  (Ahhh… some “fences” in my space are beginning to feel like supports.)

PostSignature

Post_2017-05-21_Image_OakMoanCollage

Post_2017-05-21_Poem_TreeWise